With Anna Netrebko, Salzburg sparkles a little more |

When Anna Netrebko sings, Salzburg sparkles a little more than usual. A Nobel festival that has just turned 100 needs opera, theater, theater and concerts that can be heard and seen. And he needs stars. Better yet, superstars like the Russian, who also has a name off the stage and also runs the festival …

When Anna Netrebko sings, Salzburg sparkles a little more than usual. A Nobel festival that has just turned 100 needs opera, theater, theater and concerts that can be heard and seen. And he needs stars. Preferably superstars like the Russian, who also has a name off the stage and who also made the festival herself.

Netrebko’s global career really took off after her Donna Anna from Salzburg in 2002. In terms of brand awareness and (self) marketing, she has been number one in her field for years. Worldwide. This is quite an achievement. And she manages to capture even the skeptics every time. With her stage presence and the radiance of her voice, which you could watch or listen to as she grows and matures over the past two decades. Again and again in Salzburg. Even if it was only in concert.

The down-to-earth and likable world star staging is still available as whipped cream for free on the mix. These exceptional phenomena are a boon for the industry (and for the festival). Aside from the fact that there is a lot of material for Adabei (the gossip section of the local newspapers). In addition, their own open-hearted social media presence. This includes the man by his side. First the South American Erwin Schrott and now her husband, the Azerbaijani tenor Yusif Eyvazov. What Anna Netrebko does in private is none of our business. But when he sings next to her, then, let’s say very carefully, an egg dance begins.

You as Tosca, he as Cavaradossi. On the stage of the Großer Festspielhaus, in a production by Michael Sturminger (who is currently causing a sensation with his tailor-made staging for all Lars Eidinger), which Christian Thielemann vom Graben directed at the Easter Festival 2018. Now the The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Marco Armilato delivers a dramatically sharp Puccini sound.

When Anna Netrebko takes on a role of dream soprano in Salzburg, a revival becomes an honorary premiere, so to speak. And the last big highlight of the year of the festival.

This is – very much like a superstar – related to the fact that Anna also plays herself in addition to Floria Tosca. In the first act, for example, the appearance of a confident and elegant today’s woman who not only charms her Cavaradossi with her voice, but also shows her legs. And can do both. When she sings the famous “Vissi d’arte, vissi d’amore” in the second act, she begins lying on Scarpia’s desk and ends with the great lyrical gesture like a diva on the banister. She’s actually more of herself than Puccini’s heroine. But it doesn’t matter. The real price you have to pay is Eyvazov. Anna would also shine alongside the best tenor imaginable. In this case, she must do it alone. From the palatable narrowness, to the jingling clangs in search of trumpet tones at high altitude (which it does however), its timbre remains above all a matter of taste. Even more, when Ludovic Tézier, a Scarpia of exemplary vocal nobility, gives an abysmal villain behind the facade of the man of power today. Incidentally, here he survived Tosca’s knife attack. He shot him in person in the context of St.

Then the Salzburg audience applauded his current Netrebko moment. But then it picks up quickly.

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