Münchehofe is a tiny part of Berlin, so to speak, and yet strangely already a village in the best sense of the word, aside from a few inevitable Bacon Belt houses. In the small, well-kept cemetery, the GDR’s most famous and incisive rock singer is buried – Tamara Danz, the first female head of the group Silly. She died on July 22, 1996 shortly after the release of the album “Paradies”.

Tim Hofmann: Do you come here often?

Dirk Zöllner: Yes, at least twice a year. Münchehofe is not far from my apartment in Köpenick, and it’s on the way to the Baltic Sea. We always stop there. So many memories come back here and then I tell the stories to my children. Tamara was the godmother of my eldest daughter Rubini, at the time she had offered her two rubies for the ears. She still has it …

What a little cemetery. The bird of paradise finally stayed on earth …

It is normal that it is here and not on a tourist route. You have to want to come here. How did you get to her, Silly?

At first just for the music. “Mont Klamott” was actually the first record I bought for myself when I was 13. It sounded like western music to me, completely unusual. I didn’t even notice Tamara Danz herself at first, she was just part of all the fascination. The look came later, through these, finally, “exhibition texts” …

“Your cosmetic cannula penetrates your flesh into your feelings” …

Exactly. First in 1985 “Liebeswalzer” then, two years later, “Bataillon d’Amour”. It was all in one, it was raging in you, but to talk about it? I would never have dared. And she praised it so raw and poetically as a matter of course … at the time I could almost only hear it secretly.

Yes, it often went almost to the limit of embarrassing touch. Take “So ne little woman” – that’s not nice. It shows people how they are – but you don’t even want to look first.

You were already older, so could you start right with the lyrics?

No, first for the music. There was an incredibly detailed game in it – I was interested in that. But Werner Karma’s lyrics came right out in this incredibly intense performance, without great melodies. It went through my heart – you can’t describe it at all. In the Ostrock, there was almost always this pictorial mountain of words before, but it all felt like excess fat. With karma there was philosophy, it was suddenly fun to move through this labyrinth of thoughts. I had only felt that way in people like Peter Gabriel. And Tamara has offered this in this price range as well.

When did you notice Tamara’s role in Silly? I watched her when I started making music myself shortly after “Mount Klamott” and I crept into that scene. Sometimes there are people who have a noticeable aura – and Tamara had one. When she walked into a room there was a shake and everyone wanted to talk to her.