What a prelude to the 24th Silbermann Days in the town church of Frauenstein! The opening concert was in order to wake up the already calm city on Friday evening. With the elemental strength of a rock’n’roll group, the Polish Orkiestra Historyczna and its director Martyna Pastuszka swept the baroque repertoire, including …

What a prelude to the 24th Silbermann Days in the town church of Frauenstein! The opening concert was in order to wake up the already calm city on Friday evening. With the elemental strength of a rock’n’roll group, the Polish Orkiestra Historyczna and its director Martyna Pastuszka swept the baroque repertoire, including the famous “Schranck No. 2” in the court church in Dresden , so the door was open would probably have fallen off the fishing rod – if it still existed.

It should be an “opulent and joyful prelude”, promised Albrecht Koch, president of the Gottfried Silbermann Society and artistic director of the Silbermann Days before the concert, broadcast live by several public radio stations. Under the almost shy and non-binding official motto in lowercase “heimat // welt”, which includes love of the house and cosmopolitanism (at least according to several greetings for the Silbermann Days in the program), but otherwise leaves a lot of latitude for how close the world is to the problems created by the world, that is, problems for which we are all jointly responsible. We want to celebrate that dating with music is possible again, we should also ‘complain’ about the ongoing corona pandemic – ‘but we don’t want to complain, we want to be grateful for what’s again possible, ”Koch said.

And organist Arvid Gast from Lübeck and Orkiestra Hystoryczna from Warsaw took advantage of these opportunities. Gast, also a member of the jury for the Gottfried Silbermann organ competition this year, strives to emerge from the obscurity of a year with little culture and many catastrophes, with the first composition of the evening, the Prélude pour organ in D. major of Carl Philipp Emmanuel Bach. Like all the works of the evening, it dates from the time when Gottfried Silbermann lived. Born in 1683 in the Frauenstein district of Kleinbobritzsch, trained as an organ builder from 1701 with his brother Andreas in Strasbourg, after his return to Saxony he founded an organ building workshop in Freiberg. He died in Dresden in 1753. He had a distant relationship with Johann Sebastian Bach – but of course the works of the great master of all organ compositions could not be missing in Frauenstein either. With Bach’s arrangement of a concert by Antonio Vivaldi for organ and Passacaglia for organ in C minor by Johann Sebastian Bach himself, Arvid Gast shone as a master of sensitive, dynamic and dramatic interpretation. The passaglia in particular sometimes appeared as an infinitely courageous and ever-increasing improvisation for the glory of God and of men.

Orkiestra Hystoryczna from Poland, who specializes in the practice of historically informed performance, has the same intensity. Guests from the neighboring country may be a small clue to the high Baroque era in Saxony during the era of the Saxon-Polish Union, which began with the election of Augustus the Strong as King of Poland in 1697 and s ‘was completed in 1763. The courtly instrumental repertoire of this period was kept in this “Schranck No. 2” of the Hofkirche Dresden until the second half of the 19th century, and has since been digitized and scientifically developed. The overture for two orchestras in B flat major by Johann Friedrich Fasch, the Concerto con Echo for four violins, 4 flutes, 2 violas and basso continuo in G major by Johann Christoph Richter and the concerto for violin and orchestra in C minor come from this collection with which the young Polish orchestra, which was only founded in 2012, has shown all its class and vitality. Led by violinist Martyna Patuszka, who leads the 20 musicians with eyes, the baroque big band wipes all the dust from the scores out of the imaginary closet, sweeping them all with a smile. Harpsichords, wind instruments, bass, guitar wander in weightlessness, sometimes replaced by the lute, by compositions that sound so powerful and moving, so alive and touching, as if they had been written especially for this orchestra. In Fasch’s overture in particular, the orchestra evokes feelings ranging from serious thought to dance-like exuberance, heartwarming solemn calm and playful optimism. It is as moving as it is heartbreaking. In the other compositions also, until the final “Concerto a due cori” in B flat major by Georg Friedrich Händel, the orchestra shines with an accentuated playing which naturally alternates solo and collective passages. He plays softly and clearly, confidently and sometimes almost tenderly. With all the energy and contemporary freshness, it doesn’t seem perfect every moment from a textbook’s point of view, but that feeling pales in view of the joy of playing the orchestra, with which it removes the patina of the orchestra. all compositions. And this is conveyed from the first note to the audience in the very busy church in the town of Frauenstein, who stood up and applauded a reminder and got it on a wonderful evening.

The Silbermann Days will continue on September 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the church in Schwarzenberg with “Winterreise” by Franz Schubert. On September 7, the organ concert “The Four Winds” will take place in Dresden Cathedral. www.silbermann.org

All contributions to Silver Man Days in the online special: www.freipresse.de/silbermann2021