One of the most original public works of art in the circulation area of ​​the “Free Press” made it uncomfortable to hide behind the town hall of Hohenstein-Ernstthal. As long as you can hide a sculpture about three meters high made of wonderfully rusted iron. A man who pees, the bottle still in his hand, visibly leans …

One of the most original public works of art in the circulation area of ​​the “Free Press” made it uncomfortable to hide behind the town hall of Hohenstein-Ernstthal. As long as you can hide a sculpture about three meters high made of wonderfully rusted iron. A man peeing, the bottle still in his hand, is clearly leaning against a lamppost, where at the same time a dog marks his territory with a raised paw. “Territorios” is the name of the work of Colombian artist Edgardo Carmona Vergara.

It is largely a gift from the twin city of Burghausen to Hohenstein-Ernstthal, which organized an exhibition for the artist in 2006 and made him known in Germany. Born in Cartagena in 1950, Edgardo Carmona first studied mechanical engineering and business administration, but also trained in pottery, charcoal and oil painting at the school of local art. He made his first metal sculptures in 1978, taking advantage of his years of occupation with machines and construction work. It uses pipes, rods and metal plates from hardware stores and scrap dealers. His meticulous work quickly created a sensation and has since been exhibited in Colombia, Panama, the United States, France, Italy and Germany. Edgardo Carmona has worked exclusively as a sculptor since 1999, before also achieving success as a composer and singer, writing articles on social policy in a daily newspaper and illustrating math books written by his father.

In his sculptural work, the Colombian sculptor deals mainly with everyday subjects, everyday scenes and people who are otherwise hardly objects of sculptural art. There are larger-than-life cyclists, flautists, domino players, dancers, artists, jugglers, playing kids, Don Quixotes, anglers – and also the pissing and drunk rascal who can no longer get behind a tree, in public restrooms (a lot of rare places) and his counterpart, the dog, probably doesn’t really understand the dog, even though he looks a lot like him. “Territorios” was not only controversial in Hohenstein-Ernstthal – currently there is a piece of paper on the back of the sculpture with the ironic inscription “I want to go to town hall”. When another variation of the sculpture was on display in Fort Myers, Florida, the motif was not noticed very clearly at first, but after seeing what it really was, calls were made for it to be the work of art is dismantled, which the city did not do. surrendered. On the one hand, it was taken with humor, on the other hand, it was simply taken as “life is just like that”. And the work has become one of the most popular in Florida’s outdoor exhibit.

Indeed, Edgardo Carmona’s sculptures fascinate by their proximity to life and the richness of their details. Although due to their material – old metal pieces that the artist only roughly cuts to size, screwed and welded together – he seems at first glance coarse and slightly cubist, but he also manages to give his figures a psychological dimension. The drunken man, for example, is not just a funny character supposed to provoke with his steel beam. The man’s posture and face are more indicative of real concerns that make him drink and forget good morals. Many of the Colombian’s other sculptures are also narrative: an argument between an old man and a young man on a park bench escalates into a generational conflict, a shoe shiner begs clients for a meager salary, a writer works in vain on his masterpiece. Music plays a role in many works, sometimes in the form of a bird competing with a flute player. Edgardo Carmona Vergara approaches everyday life without glorifying it, or even without trivializing it, with emotion and humor. No bad ingredients for art.