The folding thing resembled the story of the wolf; They had warned us a long time ago, but it took so long it seemed like it would never happen. Then the Mobile World Congress 2019 arrived and the wolf ate the sheep. It’s been over two years since Samsung introduced the Galaxy Fold, the first commercial product resulting from years of research and testing. It looked like it was going to end there and the Samsung Galaxy Fold would be a near-experimental product that wouldn’t have a lot of travel. It was not so.

Samsung continued to capitalize on this risky concept with the Galaxy Z Fold2, they released the Galaxy Z Flip and just launched a renewal of both with the Galaxy Z Fold3 and the Galaxy Z Flip3. Samsung believes in folding so much that along the way they loaded up a legendary series: the Galaxy Note.

You could see it coming

The Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra with S stylus

Rumors of the end of the Note series have been circulating for a long time and Samsung’s moves this year have confirmed it. The first was the launch of the S Pen for the Galaxy S21 Ultra. The S Pen was what made the Galaxy Note unique and having it compatible with the brand’s other high-end family didn’t bode well for the Note’s continuity.

On the other hand, it was during the August event that Samsung announced the note. Instead, Samsung today announced two watches, headphones, and two foldable phones, one of which also supports the S Pen. White and bottled: farewell to the Note series

A little nostalgia

Samsung launched the first Galaxy Note in October 2011 and blew us away with its then huge screen. It was only 5.3 inches tall, but at the time it was gigantic (what time). The Samsung Galaxy Note is the one who coined the term phablet or, as I like to translate it, tabletphone (a term now obsolete since everything is phablet now). If until then brands boasted of compact mobiles, this mobile would mark a turning point and take it upon them to start fighting over who had the biggest mobile.

After this success, Samsung never missed its annual meeting and presented us with new models from the range; it first did so in September coinciding with the IFA show and later, starting with the Galaxy Note 5, moved the event to August in order to play the lead role. As if that weren’t enough, the Note family overcame the Galaxy Note 7 scandal and its battery blasts that years later had airlines continue to warn.

The Galaxy Notes were unique, but over the years they have lost their essence.

At first, the Galaxy Note was clearly different from the Galaxy S: they were bigger and had the S Pen as a differential function. They were mobiles for users who wanted to maximize their productivity. Over the years the size matched and the stylus was the only thing that set it apart. After the arrival of the first Galaxy Fold, the productivity argument also fell and the Galaxy Note series was in no man’s land.

It’s not that Samsung believes in folding, it’s that it’s the only one that does

I admit I was one of those people who thought this folding thing was more of a “hey, look what we know how to do” than a strong bet that would last over time. I was partly wrong, but partly not. Since the first Fold, several folds have hit the market, but while Samsung has created continuity, the same can’t be said for other brands.

Since the first Fold, several folds have hit the market, but while Samsung has created continuity, the same can’t be said for other brands.

Currently, three brands have launched foldable cell phones in the market: Samsung, Huawei and Motorola. We can also add Xiaomi with the Mi Mix Fold and Royole with its FlexPai, but so far none of them have left China, so we haven’t included them in the table.

In the table, it is clear. Samsung has renewed its fold, Huawei and Motorola have been left behind. Huawei had the ingredients to be its strongest competitor, but the US veto has been a blow to the brand which cannot use Android or any component of US companies. Motorola for its part launched the Razr, a foldable Flip-style model with a strong nostalgic component, but so far there has been no renovation.

Samsung is alone in the race for foldable mobiles, but despite this it is not letting go of the accelerator.

We can say that Samsung is alone in the race for foldable mobiles, but despite this it is not letting go of the accelerator. After a controversial first model, Samsung continued to bet on this format, launching a second model in 2020 and renewing both in 2021.

Mission: general public

We always say foldable phones aren’t for everyone, but Samsung wants to change that by starting with the price. This year, the Fold3 was lowered to 1,799 euros, or 200 euros less than the Fold2, and 1,059 euros for the Flip3, almost 500 euros less than its predecessor. Yes, they are still expensive phones, but they are already at the level of a “normal” high end, and even cheaper depending on the model with which you compare them.

Samsung remains true to its strategy of offering products for all types of users, also in folding.

Moreover, one cannot escape that Samsung does not have one, but two folding, and each one has a totally different design. If the Fold is the foldable mobile with a clear productive and multimedia spirit, the Flip is all about design and the convenience of being able to halve its size. Samsung remains true to its strategy of offering products for all types of users, also in folding. It remains to be seen whether they will succeed in making them mainstream, but it is clear that the bet is strong, so strong that along the way they have loaded one of their most legendary ranges.