The city on a summer evening: On the famous and deserted market square of Marienberg, in the shadow of the monument to the sinister Duke Henri le Pieux, is another work of art. About two meters high, in dark and multicolored serpentine stone: the sculpture “The falling water” …

The city on a summer evening: On the famous and deserted market square of Marienberg, in the shadow of the monument to the sinister Duke Henri le Pieux, is another work of art. About two meters high, in dark and multicolored serpentine stone: the sculpture “Fallendes Wasser rises” by Andreas Hegewald.

The title suggests that the painter, graphic designer and sculptor, born in Sondershausen in 1953 and living in Dresden since the 1970s, is also a poet. His unique artist books with his own graphics and texts are highly regarded. The treatment of the stone in Marienberg recalls the graphic design of the artist: smooth shimmering surfaces which are partly very regular alternate with rough incisions, wounds in the material left natural elsewhere. A calcite dike crosses the sparkling blue, green and yellow stone. Blades of grass and leaves of seeds incorporated give it something alive. The stone is actually part of the Marienberger Marktbrunnen, but there was no water at least Monday evening. Nevertheless, the sculpture works – especially thanks to the special stone. The soft and easy-to-work serpentine stone comes from Zöblitz, where it has been mined for centuries and, among other things, has been made into everyday objects, fine tableware and furniture. The stone takes its name from the fine design, which is reminiscent of a snakeskin (lat. Serpens means snake). Today, a family from Zöblitz is doing their best to keep the serpentine stone spinning. Andreas Hegewald has worked with serpentine stone several times in Zöblitz, for example in an open air in which former world-class gymnast Erika Zuchold also participated.

Hegewald’s versatility has a long history. As a teenager, he was a member of the St. Thomas choir in Leipzig. He then attended the evening school at the University of Fine Arts in Dresden, where he studied painting and graphic design with Günter Horlbeck from 1976 to 1982. Together with other artists he founded in 1983 the Leitwolfverlag as meeting place between artists and writers, which publishes artists’ books of great quality such as the Buchenpresse Verlag, founded in 2004 with the painter Christiane Just. The two already knew each other from the Dresden art scene during the GDR era, when they were involved in stand-alone art projects. Andreas Hegewald took part in the demonstration against the state crackdown on the “photogenic” gallery with the campaign “The gallery is closed during opening hours”, among others with Carsten Nicolai from Chemnitz. Hegewald and Just also participated in the famous openings of the court of Jena, which, among others, the Freiberg TM Rotschönberg exhibited. The court openings were banned in 1988 because the state feared that they would become a “place of artistic opposition and counter-culture”, as indicated in the “Dossier: autonomous art in the GDR” of 2012. published by the Federal Agency for Civic Education. In 1990 Hegewald co-founded the nationally renowned cultural association “Riesa Efau” in Dresden. He took part in several exhibitions which honored independent art in the GDR.

About his artistic credo, Andreas Hegewald said in an interview with Gregor Kunz in 2015 for the magazine “Ostragehege”: “Art is the highest human capacity to recognize the divine in nature and through its non-nature. human in a tragic or comic way to transform it, to represent it and thus create an image of God. An image of God which vividly recalls what could really be in all your possibilities by becoming what you are. What is happy with art, it is because it shows that man can bring something to an end, but at the same time it is the beginning. ” The serpentine stone of the Marienberger Markt is a fine example.