Australia enacts new law to adapt to the search engine-social media model

London,
The new law of the British government can give an even bigger blow to Google-Facebook financially. The new law could force tech giants Google and Facebook to pay newspapers and other media outlets to use their reports. The law is based on the Australian model system.

In Australia, legislation in this direction encourages various platforms to enter into payment deals with news organisations. Now if the negotiations fail, the independent arbitrator will fix the price as he thinks fit. Thus the British government has begun to curb the growing dominance of Google-Facebook over Britain’s press freedom.

Amid the dominance of technology companies’ online ads and the threats of such domination to the interests of consumers and businesses, UK Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries introduced a bill to curb Google-Facebook. The new system will be regulated by the Digital Supervisors Digital Markets Unit (DMU), set up under the auspices of the UK Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), to curb the growing power of technology companies.

This unit will examine the algorithms used by search engines such as Google. Many news organizations believe that such search engines inadvertently channel their direct search inquiries to left-leaning news organizations. With this, people’s readings and news are filtered. This lowers the quality of the news, so these types of search engines have to pay.

A source from the UK’s Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport said the new system would be competitive and support the sustainability of the press. The new system will play a vital role in bridging the gap between large platforms and publishers. The move will allow publishers to see more transparency in the algorithm and increase its traffic and revenue.