It is hidden, apparently neatly embedded in the small valley near the large Klinovec. As if no one had to find it so that no one could destroy it: the long-lost settlement of Králův Mlýn on the bohemian side of the Ore Mountains. Across the border, better known as Königsmühle. Of the six only …

It is hidden, apparently neatly embedded in the small valley near the large Klinovec. As if no one had to find it so that no one could destroy it: the long-lost settlement of Králův Mlýn on the bohemian side of the Ore Mountains. Across the border, better known as Königsmühle. Of the only six houses that once stood there and whose inhabitants, like so many others in this region, were evicted after the war, only ruins remain. An “absolutely unique” and not only for Petr Mikšíček, cultural scientist and filmmaker from the Czech Republic, a place with a very special fascination. “You feel different here,” he says – between the ruins, the forest, the meadows and the stream; far from any civilization.

A feeling that 600 to 700 guests have shared with him regularly over three days in August for nine years – at the Land Art Festival he initiated. He had brought the idea back to Norway. There are now two associations taking care of the organization: Dokrajin from the Czech Republic and Lichtfabrik from Annaberg-Buchholz. In collaboration with the responsible authorities on site, they take care of the mowing of the meadows, the repair of the ruins and of course the preparations for the festival. Again this week, because the tenth edition starts this Friday.

It should offer a retrospective of the best of recent years. Even though many of the works of art that were created during previous festivals are no longer there. Because this art is not born only of all that one can find in the great outdoors – grass, stones, wood. Sooner or later, this art will be reclaimed by nature and the landscape. “Land Art is not eternal,” explains Petr Mikšíček.

And that’s probably why he “kept” it in one of his two new books on Königsmühle, which will be presented for the first time at the festival. In addition to literature, there is a lot of music, theater, lectures, workshops and the presentation of the latest works of art on the program.

In addition, the festival director highlights a highlight: on Sunday around thirty costumed fighters will re-enact the historic battle of Preßnitz from 1641. And of course, the Marzebilla will once again play a role of historical legend, because according to Petr Mikšíček it is an official symbol of the Bohemian Ore Mountains since 2012.

About forty volunteers ensure the smooth running of the festival, from cooking in the tent to the shuttle bus from Klinovec. And for the tenth anniversary, the organizers will also receive financial support: the German-Czech Future Fund is subsidizing the event with 250,000 crowns.

And yet, there is a downer. Because despite the “many, many experiences” and the “many energies” that Petr Mikšíček associates with the festival, it could be the last edition for the moment. The organization costs a lot of strength. In addition, there is a case of illness in the family. This is why he wishes to devote himself more intensely to women and children in the coming years. But he would be happy to hand over the function of director of the festival.

Information on access to Königsmühle and the program is available on the Internet: www.konigsmuhle.cz