After twelve years, the event was to take place in the hall again. This did not detract from the atmosphere or the enthusiasm of the musicians of the 27th Glauchau Castle International Jazz Festival.

After twelve years, the event was to take place in the hall again. This did not detract from the atmosphere or the enthusiasm of the musicians of the 27th Glauchau Castle International Jazz Festival.

Jazz is music closely linked to life. The biographies of the musicians resonate as well as the current sensibilities, the worries, the trials, the joys, the sorrows. “Jazz is the music of many,” wrote American journalist Studs Terkel and said that when one person plays, the music of many others can be heard. The Glauchau festival provided good examples of this. Three generations of musicians stood on the stage of the palace concert hall. Local hero Philipp Rumsch, born in Glauchau and already noticed here as a teenager, when he played chick-corea pieces, for example, he would have done nothing else in his life, dealt with his set of twelve people “Fear and Decision”, so the title of the disc. With unusual large instrumentation – vibraphone, electric guitar, electric and acoustic bass, cello, wind instruments, alienated spherical vocals à la Björk – in very complex, sometimes oppressive arrangements, from which feelings flare up only occasionally, Philipp Rumsch explores the psychology of situations, which probably know all too well the hundred or so guests of the concert, now freed from the mask.

The Conny Bauer Trio is completely different. Former trombone master Konrad “Conny” Bauer is also almost a regular at the Glauchau Festival. With his younger brother Matthias Bauer on bass and Norwegian drummer Dag Magnus Narvesen, they improvise a sort of elegy on life. At first glance, Matthias Bauer and Magnus Narvesen seem almost sullen to accompany Conny Bauer’s dazzling improvisations, but it is the expression of a concentration that continues to discharge a few solos and multiple applause in a smile that seems to reconcile with the world. Conny Bauer lives and breathes his instrument as the two musicians become one with their instruments. You can also be happy, feel, hurry, stroke the strings and drums, while the trumpet sends a prayer to heaven that no one can escape. A note strikes the pause that the other leaves, that is to say improvised music in the most beautiful of forms, a freedom which does not forget its responsibility towards others.

The young band from Leipzig Church Of Jupiter have not forgotten their roots either. Vincent Bababoutilabo (flute), Ulrich Hübner (tenor saxophone), Malte Sieberns (piano), Paul Lapp (double bass) and Philippos Thönes (drums) follow in John Coltrane’s footsteps. Like a New York street band who had listened for years in jazz clubs on 52nd Street, they celebrate the improvised hard bop of the 50s and 60s with a contemporary, sweaty energy, sometimes in love with ultra-fast and technical pieces. of the cabinet. With an aggressive drum finish, they seem to be saying: There’s more to come.

The Glauchau Festival celebrated once again how jazz is getting younger again and again. Just as Studs Terkel wrote in 1957: Jazz “was the music of gamblers, night owls, half-bristles, duds and hopeless cases balancing on the abyss of life. Today jazz is the music … of much of the world. The language of jazz is universal, it is the language of joy and freedom. “