Henry David Thoreau: Disobedience to the Shadows of Civilization |

If a man walks half a day in the woods out of love for them, writes the American Henry David Thoreau, he risks being considered a wanderer – but if he uses his whole day as a speculator, he mows these woods and These Makes the earth bare before its time, so it will be as a hardworking and enterprising citizen …

If a man walks half a day in the woods out of love for them, writes the American Henry David Thoreau, he risks being considered a wanderer – but if he uses his whole day as a speculator, he mows these woods and these Bare Earth in advance, he is appreciated as a hardworking and enterprising citizen. It was therefore Thoreau’s passionately chosen profession to always be vigilant and to seek God in nature, to know his hiding places and to listen to all the oratorios and operas in nature – this goal of Thoreau for a meaningful life. defines Susanne Schaup, the author of the biography, right at the start of her 280-page book on “Literary History’s Most Famous Abandonment.”

Thoreau, born in Concord, Massachusetts, in 1817, was a keen observer: of nature, of human coexistence, of an unjust state, the ravages of a for-profit economy – and that already at the beginning of the 19th century. The son of a pencil maker has always lived by his truth – and it has never been negotiable for him. The philosopher and naturalist has become a role model for generations to this day: reading, writing, thinking, exploring nature and not wasting too much time earning a salary.

Thoreau’s maxims also included disobedience to oppressive nonsense (1849: On the Duty to Disobey the State) – Thoreau’s attitude later inspired Ghandi and Martin Luther King to a resistance guided by conscience and Nonviolence. It was Thoreau who coined the term civil disobedience. He first rose to prominence in Germany during the student movement of the 68s, his book “Walden – Life in the Woods” was considered compulsory work for critical thinking and the commitment to place one’s own conscience above the law. It was the literary journal about retreating to the woods and implementing a constructive, alternative way of life that did not exploit, murder, subjugate or torture other living things – which Thoreau did seemed hardly achievable in the “civilized” world. His departure was often glorified, when he moved into a log cabin by a lake near his hometown on July 4, 1845, the symbolic American Independence Day, in order to live there alone for two years: this was not complete isolation – but a drastic reduction in paid employment through the simplest possible life.

Ten chapters now extend in the new biography “Henry David Thoreau: realist and mystic” from his childhood in Concord to his youth and phase of identity search, his way of writing, his experience “Walden”, his rebellion against the state of injustice. in the last years of his life. They bring to light interesting details of this unusual life and raise many questions about the comfort of his own life and his own thinking.

The detailed, in-depth and in-depth monograph opens the comprehensive works of the pioneer of the ecological movement and of a socially just state, Henry David Thoreau. The Leipziger Verlagbuchhandlung S. Göbel is known to only publish titles that correspond to the truth and the conscience of the publisher – in the mind of Thoreau. The admiration of author Susanne Schaup and publisher Stefan Göbel for Thoreau is seen in the book: the attention to detail, the design, the thoroughness of the research, the clarity and the very readable presentation of the results of research are great reading pleasure. A meticulously and lovingly composed rarity!

Susanne Schaup’s book: “Henry David Thoreau – Realist and Mystic”, New Edition, 280 pages, 30 euros.

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