You would think that the life of Andreas Freiberg only became really exciting after the fall of the wall: together with the future star of HP scooters Baxxter, he sold dance CDs and, equipped with a stable company car , has come all the way as music director for the Edel record company in Germany. But with this dream that he lived, the …

You would think that the life of Andreas Freiberg only became really exciting after the fall of the wall: together with the future star of HP scooters Baxxter, he sold dance CDs and, equipped with a stable company car , has come all the way as music director for the Edel record company in Germany. But in the last pages of his autobiography “Freibergs Freiheit”, the native of Selva is quite quickly done with this dream he lived – he is stingy with anecdotes of his many personal “Weststar” encounters from Otto Waalkes to Alice Cooper, perhaps also because he writes it himself, has noticed that the formulation of these is not one of his talents.

But this is precisely what makes the great strength of the book to read in a market so richly saturated with anecdotes from the East and its rock that one hardly wants to hear it any more: Freiberg is not a decorator, he tells with an idiosyncratic tale of sober relaxation from his daily life as a lighting designer in the groups Simple Song and Zwei Weg, and with that he has several points.

First: With all the illumination of the Ostrock since the fall of the Wall, this point has hardly happened so far. We read and heard all the time that the musicians of the GDR were keen on Western instruments, that there was a “black market” for them and that the groups would otherwise have to improvise a lot. How it worked in detail has never been described in such detail before Freiberg, and as the industry was extremely well networked at the time due to the need described, the memories you wrote carry some weight. .

Second: The focus of such narratives is actually always either on Karat stars or on subversive and politically offensive artists like Renft. Freiberg moved with “his” bands to an exciting threshold, where successful cover rock bands from Dorfsaal attempted the leap into the professional arena of the GDR, including radio, the Palace of the Republic and a tour along of the road. It also provides insight into the earning potential of this parallel world of “Aggressors” and their culture. The very fact that Michael Nagel, the boss of “Simple Song” was able to set up his own house in Dresden, speaks volumes. The detailed description of how the de facto existence of independent roadies in the GDR was handled is also very exciting, Freiberg also gives an in-depth look at how the much-touted procurement intelligence of GDR citizens within of “one-hand-washes-die – other” networks worked. Here, too, the fact that the author shows little skill in bragging about rock’n’roll myths is a blessing worthy of being. read: Instead, it brings back beautiful everyday things, from fixing Saporoshez to buying a campsite, and therefore is a lot more entertaining than when organizing behind-the-scenes stories.

Third: Between the lines, “Freibergs Freiheit” says a lot about how city hall culture works, explains the cultural power of hosts and a kind of market economy behind the scenes. In short: where Ostalgia is often only touched on, there is a sharper image that makes the niches of the German Democratic Republic easier to understand.

The author will present his biography on Sunday 5 September at 4 p.m. in the castle of his hometown of Selva.

The book Andreas Freiberg: “Freibergs Freiheit. From rock ‘n’ roll of the East to the sound of the West”, Notschriften-Verlag Radebeul, 368 pages, 24 euros.