“A piece of wood is first and foremost an idea that grabs you – and this piece, as it sounds here, can be a sort of appeal – a recitative.” Schwarzenberg native Hans Brockhage captured, described and shaped the essence of wood like virtually no other contemporary woodcarver.

“A piece of wood is first and foremost an idea that grabs you – and this piece, as it sounds here, can be a sort of appeal – a recitative.” Schwarzenberg native Hans Brockhage captured, described and shaped the essence of wood like virtually no other contemporary woodcarver.

This is also the case with the “sign”, which found its place in front of the Oberwiesenthaler K 3, the former Royal Saxon Forest Office, which now houses information for customers, a museum and a library. Hans Brockhage’s “sign” is not so favorable among many signs. The fact that it can still stand up to information boards, priority signs, charging stations and no-stop signs is testament to the power of Brockhagescher’s design art. The four trunks of different heights united in a group, sawn into square columns, roughly hewn, burned, with wounds, were created by Hans Brockhage 1988, who was born on February 27, 1925 in Schwarzenberg and also died there on February 18 2009 There were his beloved Ore Mountains marked by dying forest. Countless trees had taken the bare form of such “signs” without the aid of saws or axes, and loomed accusingly against the air polluted sky. But the artistic work of Hans Brockhage is rarely reduced to an observation.

After graduating from high school, military service and a serious injury, Brockhage began an apprenticeship as a woodcarver in 1945. He was fortunate enough to study with the Dutch architect and designer of the Bauhaus Mart Stam in a relatively free and open phase at the University of Fine Arts in Dresden. Under his leadership, Hans Brockhage designed the famous rocking cart, children’s furniture and play equipment that are still considered a masterpiece combining aesthetic form and functionality. In 1950/51, Brockhage was one of the last students of Chemnitz Bauhaus artist Marianne Brandt. The two remained friends until Brandt’s death in 1983. From 1967 to 1977 Hans Brockhage was a lecturer at the Burg Giebichenstein College of Industrial Design in Halle / Saale, then at the Technical School of Applied Arts in Schneeberg. .

He works both figuratively and abstractly. In some cases, he combined wood with concrete and metals. His work can still be found today in many public and private buildings, such as the New Synagogue and the Bonhoeffer Community Center in Chemnitz, in the Fichtelberghaus, in former holiday homes and canteens. The Neue Sächsische Galerie Chemnitz has contributed to the creation of a catalog raisonné, has so far registered around 150 free sculptures, 50 building-related crafts and many handicrafts – and is grateful for the additional references to the works of Hans Brockhage in private and public property.

Schwarzenberger was the philosopher among wood designers, perhaps because he himself understood the soul of wood. For Hans Brockhage, the wood told: “About the voices of the wind in the rocky gorges … – dense clusters in the wood, the moving clouds which cross the room and resist it. , an objective . “Since 1988, since the ‘Sign’ of Brockhage, the forest of the Ore Mountains has grown again.” On the highest mountain in our state of Saxony – to which I am drawn again and again, I wanted to show as much as possible this causal factor of wood, “Hans Brockhage wrote of another work. But this” causality “can also be seen in his” sign “in Oberwiesenthal – and they are more durable than those on the signboards next to it. .